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their lives in that attack, trying to protect americans. and that is a different thing. i don't think -- that has, in my opinion, no relationship to what happened in iran which was all caught up with where the shah was going, what the reaction would be, whether we had adequate security. what happened in libya, the ambassador wanted to get out, he wanted to not be holed up in the embassy in tripoli. he realized there was some risk because this happened in iraq, too, but in a different way. when you get rid of an old regime, you know, one of the things they try to maintain control of was their security services, for obvious reasons. every dictatorship does, right? so they took down the old security service, and they hadn't really built -- had time to build up their own. and there was a lot of weapons floating loose in the country. but i think the american people, for all the tragedy here, could take a lot of comfort in the fact that libyan citizens stormed the offices of some of these militia groups to get the weapons out. they are trying to fix it. >> i mean, they forced a couple of th
biography we are in the same boat. i have been writing about lyndon johnson so long that people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. the one reason i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just as i didn't think of the power brokers being about robert moses, i never had the slightest interest in writing the book just to tell the wife of a famous man. from the moment i first thought of doing books i thought of biographies, i thought of biographies as a way of examining the great forces that shape the times that they live-and particularly political power. why is political power so important? we live in a democracy so ultimately we have the power and the votes we carry to the ballot boxes and the more that we know about how political power really works, not as it is taught in textbooks and colleges but the raw naked reality of political power, the better our votes should be and the better our countries should be and lyndon johnson was the right man to examine political power. he was such a genius in the use of it, bending congress and washingt
of over 150,000 american men and women in my hands. i don't want to make a mistake. i'm human, and i recognize that i might. and i worry about that. regardless of the outcome, if when this whole thing is over i can say to myself, you gave it your best shot, then that's got to be enough. >> good morning. it's he friday, december 28th. on set with us the co-host of "sfreet signs" is brian sullivan who just showed up here. president of the national action network is rev raend al sharpton and fortune editor lee gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to fi
somewhere in the middle of where both parties stand. and we also know that if we don't act, 100% of the american people are going to start feeling an impact of higher taxes. i honestly don't worry about the millionaires and billionaires at all. i don't worry about the people who are fine, who don't even really know or care that much about a tax hike that takes them back to the clinton years when they did very well. i don't worry about those folks. i worry about the folks in the middle. and there are always arguments about what is that line? and some say the middle class is at $75,000, some say $150,000, some even go higher because there are states like my state that are very high cost-of-living states. but we know, if we're going to get a deal, we're going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. to me, if we fail, it will be a very, very sad moment in history. and i hear a lot of talk about the sequester. well, mr. president, i don't know exactly how you voted, but i want to say that i voted for a sequester, if we couldn't find savings as part of a debt limit deal. and i'm not
hands don't change until they've absorbed lots of punishment, see dems 1968 to 1988, a long stretch, gop not done yet. i thought that was such an interesting point you made that night, because for a lot of people watching, it is hard to understand why a combination of tax cuts for most of the country and spending cuts and according to the last offer a type of social security benefit cut is not good enough for a republican party that just got walloped in the election. can you expound on your theory there? >> first, let me just talk about democrats. you're too young to remember this, ari, but there was a period of time when people were wondering -- >> i dyed my hair, john. >> people were wondering when democrats could ever win a presidential election again, that's because they were on the wrong side of main street america, on some cultural change happening in the country. they were on the wrong side of issues like the death penalty, on issues like the use of force in foreign affairs, and it wasn't until they'd gotten whacked, george mcgovern lost overwhelmingly, mike ducacas was beaten pre
. >> not nothing, you just don't do it with strangers. >> i'm happy to make it. absolutely. but here's something for you. you are watching "morning joe." here's what happens. right now it's time for that. take it away. >> aloha, hawaii. the president is on his way back to d.c. where for him it's about playing small ball with most members of congress still in their home district, speaker boehner put that ball in the senate's court. harry reid tossed it right back. are we looking at another lost day in the negotiations? hitching a right on air force one, the new senator from hawaii and it's not what we expected it to be. here we go again. the president in washington and another deadline. secretary geithner warns we will hit the debt ceiling even before we tumble over the fiscal cliff. good morning from washington. it is thursday, december 27th. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert. two days after christmas and washington is back to work trying to harsh out a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. the senate will get back from the session after holiday break. the president is expected to arrive b
this mean for the fiscal cliff discussions? >> well, i don't think it really means a whole lot. i think it is -- sort of the white house's way, treasurer's way, of putting extra pressure on the people in the building behind us. by the way, none of them are there. i'm not sure that's really going to work, frankly. and -- i -- john, our colleague john harwood is exactly right. this is not a surprise. we knew this was coming. the question that it is, you know, three days -- thee business days, as you say before, the actual deadline itself, that's disconcerting. but -- again, it is not surprising. i don't think it has any -- will peak the negotiations at all, frankly. not at all. >> what about the secretary's use of this phrase -- the country would otherwise default on its legal obligations. i think he purposefully use this phrase default to confuse the public and -- during the last debt ceiling debate we had the same confusion as if the u.s. government would not pay interest on its debts. have -- you know perfectly well will is about a million things. i have been in the country where they
. . this book is -- i want to read from the book of course, but i don't want to give away too much because this first chapter is going to describe why i wrote this book so maybe i should read the first chapter and then i will talk about the book and kind of expand what it's about. okay. i'm going to read the first chapter. first chapter is called tainted vegetables and it starts with the little tag line that says i like my town with a little drop of poison. every spring i plant a garden. a small but noble pursuit, small in the sense there are many important items on the calendars of our lives. noble because each step of safety because of sustainability has the food industry and its own game. in my line of work i travel a lot sometimes to places where food is measured by cups of rice and water is delivered by tenure rules that have to walk 5 miles to get to the well. plants in the garden is a way of keeping the harsh reality of the world at bay. it seems the same practice in the world to help. i grew up on a farm so speaking to a buddy on the pomegranate seems natural to me sometime
. >> you can't! or at least tell them not to eat the hamburger before they go on the ride, you know. don't eat the burrito. >> the all you can eat vietnam buffet. >> do it after the ride. . >>> i want you guys to meet charlie. he is an american staffordshire terrier. this is in san francisco. that is where charlie lives. charlie is in danger of losing his family and his life. charlie was taken to a park where animals are allowed to run off leash. he got into an incident. police say charlie attacked a horse with a cop on his back. because he is a pit bull, charlie has been taken from his owner. >> oh, wow. that's a big gouge on the horse's thigh. >> the dog went after a horse with a cop on it. >> yes. >> oops. >> this is charlie's owner. he's really disappointed. >> i'm a little nervous but i'm trying to be optimistic. >> ktvu talked to the owner of charlie before a hearing where police were going to hear from the park's officer that was involved in the incident and the dog's owner. >> he was just completely covered by gashes, blood. the dog chased my horse for 1.6 miles. that's unheard o
and we don't be what that will be and we should get more clarity on that tomorrow if there is, in account fa, a meeting at the white house we might find out what they're hammering out behind closed doors. >> thus far, democrats have refused to do any meaningful entitlement reform and republicans have refused to do anything related to taxes. we both know each side wants a piece of the other to do those exact things and both sides still refuse. is there anything that means those two factors have changed. >> we saw it on the stock market today and we saw the wild swings as news developments happened throughout the course of the day. it impacted the market throughout date and if that continues that kind of pressure from the outside could really put some force on these members of congress to come together for a deal. the closer we get the more pressure from the outside they're going feel and i think it makes it easier, not harder to get a deal in the last 48 to 24 hour space lot of folks have said that's the sweet spot for a deal anyway and there's another group that says we're going over this
're saying they may not be possible if if the freshman and now sophomores and many members who come and don't eventually give a nether blessing to cut a deal. in her may feel in the same tough spot now that but he was last year. a ground part and based on what you say may not be possible if obama wins under any circumstances. >> this is outside of the book but i will do it anyway because i've been doing general election for the times. talking to jim messina the campaign manager of the obama campaign and david axelrod and rahm emanuel and stephanie cutter and asking them you know, how would the next years under obama, given that the house composition -- >> is almost certainly going to be similar. >> how will things be different and uniformly their answer, in other words the talking point, was that the fever will break, that the american people if they vote for president obama for another four years will basically be voting against obstructionist and the republicans will get the message and they will walk in a sultry fashion toward the center of. >> i can see that happening at all. >> no, no
of play. you don't have to answer it. the correct answer-- the wave... >> yeah. meredith: is the right--was that one of the ones you were-- >> i was leaning towards stomping feet, and i just figured that was way too obvious, based on my memory of the film. meredith: ok, so it's a good thing that you've jumped over this, but there is a price to be paid. how much money did you forfeit? hopefully not too much. $10,000 behind that question. >> ha ha! i'm still playing. meredith: yes, you are. you are still playing. by jumping the question, you're now 11 away from the million dollars and you are at "double money" at this point. the brand oxo was created after founder sam farber saw his wife, betsey, having difficulty gripping what? cosmetic brushes, office supplies, kitchen tools, golf clubs. you get it right, you double the money behind the question. >> heh heh! just watched a documentswer is c--kitchen t answer is c--kitchen tools. ha ha! meredith: you're gonna double your money. it is kitchen tools. let's see how much money is behind this question. whatever it is, you get twice that amou
because they were in the wrong hour, in the middle of it. don't say to clint eastwood, don't go out and wing it. there has been considerable cottage industry of finger pointing. most of loyal campaign ads are blaming romney himself. >> i it was struck by tom hamburger's piece that called the campaign campaign malpractice. there were so many mistakes it was obvious to the press. the republicans kept saying it was media bias but it was badly run campaign and the voters should showed it was clear. >> when he wee got to the debates, they had to thumb on one side, memorable moment when cnn's kennedy crowley gave the president a little lift. >> it took him 14 days before he called the attack in benghazi. >> he did in fact first. he did call it an act of terror. it did, as well, two weeks or so for the whole idea of being their a riot to come out. >> after the president had done so poorly. did that salvage the race for him? >> it certainly helped. look, again this is where romney look what you just saw was my opponent and my other opponent candy crowley teaming up against me. it's a hard s
will crash a little bit. i don't want to say crash as in crash but we could retrace some of the gains and a rough start to 2013 until they finally realize that maybe the large-cap companies could be leading us through the rallies. maybe it will take the stocks back up the latter half of 2013, first quarter. >> oliver, what are you doing with your clients' money right now? >> we think there will be a selloff as a result of all of this and also the debt ceiling debate coming up at the end of january and that's a buying opportunity because there's relatively strong, and strong gdp growth in the second half of 2013 so we would see a 5%, 7% selloff as a heck of a buying opportunity early in the year. >> i see you've got a year-end target for 2013. 1540, actually -- just looking at the 2013 predictions, you're pretty bullish. >> yeah. we think we're going to see a 6%, 6.5% return on the s&p. we think dividend-paying stocks will do even better and will focus on companies that are growing revenues and paying a strong dend. >> can i ask you a question about that scenario. >> of course. >> supp
because they still don't know how he died. he was severely ill before his death and they are investigating. >> there was a report he suffer from aids. any word on that tonight. >> reporter: they could only say he was severely ill. it's really tough to tell how he died. >> all right. thank you. >>> a young woman aspiring to become a police officer now finds herself in the gears of the criminal justice system. police say she was drunk behind the wheel last week when she ran down a group of people sightseeing at twin peaks. >> reporter: instead of upholding the law, gina eunice, seen here in an orange jumpsuit, found herself on the wrong side of the law. >> she was studying criminal justice, hoping to become a police officer. >> reporter: her attorney says eunice was about to graduate from college. the district attorney charged the 23-year-old woman with driving under the influence, hit-and-run and vehicular manslaugher. those are just some of the six charges she's facing after police say she drove her car into a group of people last week at the twin peaks vista point in san francisco. the ac
, as a professor once said, he was doing a lot. what he was really doing was keeping us out of war. and you don't get credit for things that don't happen. but he for eight years, got us out -- we were in korea when we got in, he got us out by bluffing, basically. >> brinksmanship. >> threatening to use the bomb and other things. then he spent the next eight years at a scary, dangerous time. the cold war is getting going, nuclear weapons are new things, communist threats all over the place. he basically bluffed our way through eight years. we didn't lose any soldiers, department get into any wars, stayed out of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking
to be managed, not to be resolved once and for all. meaning we can protect the chemical weapons. we don't have to go in and turn syria into a democracy. >> you want the united states to build one of the points that the report makes early on, to build on comparative strengths and address comparative weaknesses. from your standpoint what are those strengths that need to be built on, and then what are the weaknesses that need to be addressed? >> well, our military forces have unprecedented capabilities. we've spent a lot over the last 10 years, as you know, and it shows in our naval power, our air power, our space capabilities, our intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance capabilities. our forces are flexible to move quickly all over the world and conduct campaigns of unprecedented lethalty really. and that's what we want to build on, that kind of ability to reach out and either help people in natural calamities, or pound someone who is doing harm to us or our friends. >> what are comparative weaknesses that need to be addressed? >> the weakness is not the fault of anyone in the military. the w
by the president and harry reid and nancy pelosi. i hope it actually is the beginning of a deal because if we don't get it done now, we need to go and make sure that things get done so we don't raise taxes and taxes aren't raised for all these americans that are looking at it come january 1st. >> why did he fly all the way back from hawaii and cut his vacation short if he's eager to go over the cliff in is that part of his charade. >> if he wants to actually blame other people for his lack of leadership he has to appear, at least, to be coming back to find a solution. if the president was really interested in the level of the debt we have in this country, the $16 trillion, we would have had a budget passed in the senate sometime in the last three years. he proposed a budget and none of the democrats even voted for it. it got 0 votes. i don't think the president is focused where we ought to be focused which is the spending. we have a spending problem. he's fixated on tax rates that only give you about seven days of what the government spends. >> he didn't get any votes on his budget or not very ma
was comparatively pretty good, this the president said no, now you don't want to raise tax rates because the economy is fragile. gdp is worse now, is that? >> i think almost exactly two years ago, the president said the economy is too fragile to raise taxes on anyone. so what you have essentially was a deal that was put together. remember back in december of 2010 when we were facing a very similar situation where they agreed to extend all the tax cuts for two years. by the way, that is why we are facing this new fiscal cliff. it is infuriating to business owners. i have been talking to a lot of them last couple of weeks. this is banana republic type of politics. no one knows what it will look like. it makes it impossible for businesses to do planning, purchasing equipment, hiring workers. you are seeing the impact on the stock market already where we have a lousy 10 days with stocks because everybody is in this kind of state of fear and trepidation that we are going to go over this cliff. i will give you a sliver of good news, i talked to some of my sources in the republican leadership and they say
filmmakers were excited that they could have a female hero, i don't think gender matters here when you are committing war crimes, torture, it doesn't matter what your gender,it matters that you are violating the rules of the united states and seeking to break the minds and bodies of your fellow human beings. >> very well stated. thank you very much. that's "the ed show" i'm michael eric dyson in for ed schultz. "the rachel maddow show starts now. ezra klein is filling in for rachel tonight. >> thank you, michael. thank you to you at home for sticking around for the next hour. rachel has the night off but we have big news out of washington, where nothing is happening. the house is not in session, and as of this moment has no plans to be in session for the end of the year. nothing is stirring, not even harry reid. yes, i'm still in the christmas spirit. the president meanwhile is in hawaii and won't be returning until tomorrow. now, normally nothing happening would not be big news in washington. nothing happening is kind of the status quo in washington. getting nothing done is to our
. barnicle, what gifts did you give? >> i give a gift that you don't have to assemble to everyone in my family. i give myself. that's it. that's all you get. all right? and that is all you get right now. >> boo! >> this is harsh. this is harsh. all right. "morning joe" starts right now. >>> make no mistake about it, if we go over it, god forbid, and i still don't think we have to, the american people are going to blame the republican party, and they'll come right back and pass something. so i don't think the middle class is at risk. because if we go over the cliff, our republican colleagues are going to come back and say uh-oh and then pass the bill we passed in the senate already. >> i think $250,000 is too low a threshold. a lot of working people who are couples would exceed that, and i don't think we need that kind of shock to the system. however, i've talked to some of my democratic colleagues, and they are saying maybe in the $400,000 or $500,000 category, we could set a benchmark. i do think it is essential that we start talking about what amount can be passed on a bipartisan basi
board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were people on the right to and those who would disagree to say he apologizes for america and pulls out from the allies and those that say he should not send t
and saying, we love roon, we don't want anything bad to happen to roon, but he's got to move on because things are not getting done. cnn was on the table at that point. they become successful. nbc was on the rise, had taken over number one. they said you have a replacement. so i spent a year and a half or so looking for a suitable replacement for this legend. i tried inside and outside. essentially i pulled a dick cheney. and i said to my boss, i sub-optimizing do we can do but do they want to do. i know these people, i've worked with him as the lawyer and her boss. am not sure what to do. he said i think you can do but i'm not sure you want to. we talked about over two or three months and end up going in. i went going in as a good corporate citizen because i valued abc news. it needed to help. i thought i would give her two years or so. the great shock to me was i really came to love it. sort of a convert in the journalism. it was a remarkable experience and they really inspirational experience for me. >> tell me about the trials and trouble haitians of president bill clinton. you're c
there was no mention of an alternative possibility. they serve american lives because it is about the fanatics, you don't hear but the russian side of the equation and the other traces that could be had. >> it stirs up controversy and i wonder if we could move on to some of the areas that they argue have already elicited the commentary on different sides. the cold war is essential to when you write about here and to the film, and perhaps as i read it your argument mentions that the united states is primarily to blame, that stalin and the soviets would have been open to a new welcoming continuation of the wartime alliance between the two countries, but it was the american actions primarily. some allies, the british for example, which leader of a wanted gold for. is that an adequate portrayal? >> guest: i would say that's accurate. we certainly don't consider the stalin to be blameless in all of this and we certainly don't downplay the brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of t
. >> like it was a harvard law review just to show who is the smartest person in the room. we don't need the smartest person in the room. we immediate somebody to say all right, america, we need to deal with revenues. that's the bad news. we immediate to deal with the medicare fiscal cliff or you are not going on get your medical bills paid. >> remembering an american original. >> iraqis are dumb muff to attack her going to pay a terrible price. >> nicknamed stormin' norman for his ledgendary temper. he died thursday due to complications from pneumonia. >>> it is a year comes to a close, we look back at the amr moments that left us starstruck and speechless in 2012. >>> good day. i'm luke russert. live in washington, d.c. in for andrea this afternoon is the calm before the economic storm white house officials and congressional leaders have kept quiet. ahead of the pivotal round table discussions we all hope can produce some kind of plan to prevent a fiscal cliff dive in the new year. you guessed it. another day without a deal means more losses on wall street. look at those numbers will.
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spent the day here and it didn't get active until a couple of hours ago and as i look around, i don't see a lot of people with bags. i'm not sure they're shopping. but the retailers really hope they will because because they are in a lot of hurt. susan wanted to buy toys for her grandchildren but couldn't manage to go to a toy store. visions of the sandy hook elementary school massacre were in her head. >> i couldn't take the shopping and seeing all the little kids 5-year-olds, 6-year-olds, particularly saddens me. >> reporter: she bought gift cards instead and none of the extra stuff she might have been found being in stores. december retail is a bummer in the news and stores. >> this is not at all a good holiday season for the retailer. >> reporter: it could have been for the customer. >> 495. our price is 179 and an additional 10% now. >> reporter: and no one is buying it? >> not yet. >> reporter: this shop slashed prices as retailers did all over the country. still, it was not a good christmas for her nor most others. >> it started out all right and it just dropped off about a w
to you by consumer cellular. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> welcome back. since the newtown, connecticut school attack, there's been plenty of talk about arming teachers and two-thirds of americans believe arming at least one official would be somewhat effective against attacks. >> cecilia vega reports. >> reporter: the gun is fake. but these utah teachers fear the threats facing their classrooms is very real. 200 of those teachers became students. packing a conference room on their holiday break to learn how to carry a concealed weapon on the job, and how to protect their schools from an armed intruder. >> the safety is the biggest part and to be able to use them appropriately is really high priority for me. >> reporter: utah is one of few states where public schools allow guns on campus. but in the wake of
, i don't recall how i made it back across that bridge to the church. but after i got back to the church, the church was full to capacity, more than 2,000 people on the outside trying to get in to protest what had happened on the bridge. and someone asked me to say something to the audience. and i stood up and said something like: "i don't understand it, how president johnson can send troops to vietnam but cannot send troops to selma, alabama, to protect people whose only desire is to register to vote." the next thing i knew, i had been admitted to the local hospital in selma. amy goodman: explain that moment where you decided to move forward, because i don't think the history we learn records those small acts that are actually gargantuan acts of bravery. talk about-i mean, you saw the weapons the police arrayed against you. what propelled you forward, congressmember lewis? rep. john lewis: well, my mother, my father, my grandparents, my uncles and aunts, and people all around me had never registered to vote. i had been working all across the south. the state of mississippi
who we are, where we are and what our homely words and thoughts and deeds and lives don't mean. still, enduring merit, until this summer did i even believe in it? did i simply believe enduring merit could never be agreed upon, that all things are relative and, therefore, can not be said to have merit and their endurance cannot be predicted? if so, i no longer believe it or even remember believing it. these five radioactive books glowed green and dustless among the others. if they are not still read in 100 years, it will mean the cockroaches only survived whatever happened to vegas. there is always more mystery in a closed box than in an opened box. nope. when it comes to a box full of poetry, that is not true. over the summer those boxes turned into a room full of books full of poetry, full of mystery. living at the center of that mystery and indulging one's self in the central and intellectual pleasures of poetry for months, if there's anything better on this planet than the impulse to poetry, i have no idea what it could b be, and i feel so grateful to have been born to have seen th
really the prime negotiators for weeks and weeks, don't have a good level of trust, don't have a good relationship, these two men do. senator reid and senator mcconnell know each other and work together as only leaders of the senate have to and have to come to really rely on each other. and so maybe when it comes to the relationships here in washington, it's a good thing that it's these two men that are working together and you're right, it does rest on their shoulders right now. >> dana bash, covering the stories for us on capitol hill. i have with me michael crowley, and a.b. stoddard and jessica yellen. >> it's great if the two can come to an agreement and the white house loves it, but it's always been the house that's been the sticking point. what do you think the scenario is there, a.b.? >> that's going to be tough for the house speaker. he said on friday in meeting with all the leaders and the president that he wanted to bring something up. might be amended and sent back to the senate. he doesn't know what's in there. how much money the democrats are going to push for to cover t
should not have to wait and see is some sort of action so if we don't see an agreement between the two leaders in the senate, i expect a bill to go on the floor. and i've asked senator reid to do this, put a bill on the floor that makes sure that taxes on middle-class families don't go up. that unemployment insurance is still available for 2 million people, and that lays the groundwork then for additional deficit reduction and economic growth steps that we can take in the new year. >> all of this still developing. and we will have more on all of it with mark shields and david brooks later in the program. >> also ahead >> warner: also ahead, between now and then; protesting a gang rape in india; mass producing high quality education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the unio
trying to deflect attention on to me and my colleagues over the past few weeks is that they don't have a plan of their own that could get bipartisan support. the so-called senate bill that the majority leader keeps referring to passed with only democratic votes and despite the deep calls for the house to pass it, he knows as well as i do that he himself is the reason it can't happen. the paperwork never left the senate. there's nothing for the house to vote on the as i pointed out before we took the vote back on july the 25th the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal, as i said at that time, was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster and that democrats were really serious they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house, as the constitution requires, and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called senate bill is nothing more than a glorif
questions before he and as opposed to asking questions they don't know about to get a more natural response? >>guest: i always do the latter and prepare a great deal to have a long list of questions. it is more valuable to have that spontaneous exchange. . . reading your book, maybe i am reading in to this but did you talk with the queen in crafting your book? >> well, the queen, as a policy and is probably sensible from her standpoint, which is that in her entire 60 year reign she has never given an interview and that has helped probably to preserve her mystique and is kept her from having to pick and choose who she might give interviews to. i was lucky to meet her three times and private social settings and i describe her three times in the book. at each of them was brief, but revelatory and in each case it gave little glimpses of that private side, that gaiety of spirit, the flash of wit and so, they were very valuable to me. i also watched her a lot in different settings. i traveled with her overseas. i traveled with her around the u.k. so i could see how she interacted with people. in
were fanatics. you don't hear the russian side of the equation and the choices that could be had. >> these books have to stand up to controversy and i wonder if we could cover the areas that obviously -- the story is -- has already elicited commentary. and as i read it, your argument is that the united states is primarily to blame for the beginning of the cold war, that stalin and the soviets would have been open to -- were welcoming a continuation of the wartime alliance between the two countries but it was american actions primarily, with in allies, british, for example, which were involved in the cold war. is that accurate? >> i'd say that is accurate. certainly don't consider stalin blameless in all of this, and certainly don't downplay stalin's brutality or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as
are beginning a campaign, i don't know how large the campaign is going to be, to have inscribed on some of the sleeves that go around their coffee to make it easier to hold, going to write "come together" in a message to politicians in washington, and you know, if coffee can't unite people, what can? >> let's hope. the clock's still ticking. john harwood in washington, thank you. >>> what are the chances that a deal can be reached this week? jonathan allen is a senior correspondent at politico. welcome. you just heard john harwood say that there are some rumblings that there might be a 50/50 chance of a so-called mini deal that would do something to avoid the sequestration and avoid the worst of the tax hikes. is that what you're hearing? >> that's how bad it is. we're down to a 50/50 chance of a mini deal. for two years the president and the congress together collectively and also individually essentially abdicated their leadership on the budget. i don't know why anybody would necessarily expect that to change over the next two or three days so the best you could hope for is a little b
an hour too late to my wife shaking me. >> juliet: i don't know what it is about this morning. i'm like in lala land. >> clayton: there is no snow. >> juliet: there's no snow here, sir. >> clayton: it might be be the pending fiscal cliff. >> juliet: that's exactly what it is. >> clayton: honestly if you read the different newspaper reports what in the world is going on with the fiscal cliff, you hear about a small deal sort of in the works between harry reid and mitch mcconnell, maybe it's not voted on until monday, maybe no deal at all. maybe sequestration is going to happen so for that let's go to washington. >> juliet: all right. tick-tock, tick-tock, time is almost up for lawmakers as we say to avert the fiscal cliff. they worked throughout the weekend in hopes of hammering out some sort of deal. >> dave: peter doocy is live in washington and we hustle you over to the capitol. and what is the latest, do you think we'll get something done? >> reporter: dave, we were told late in the evening that legislative staff was going to work through the night, but the only principal we heard fr
the weapons? no. we don't know where they came from but we'll find out. >> rampage, an armored personnel carrier used to evacuate residents. by the time firemen were able to respond, seven homes burned. gunman had been convicted and paroled after beating his grandmother to death with a hammer in 1980. tonight authorities say his sister is unaccounted for after the fire in their home. doug? >> david lee milner new york. thank you, david. american contractor working as an advisor with nato command in afghanistan was shot and killed today by afghan policewoman. the incident occurred outside police headquarters in kabul. the first known insider attack bay woman in afghanistan. >> as the faithful gather in bethlehem to usher in christmas, residents in syria praying for peace, if not on earth in their country. unfortunately, correspondent leland vittert tells us. that prayer doesn't look like it will be answered anytime soon. >> syrian rebels say the government tanks fired some type of poison gas on the city of homs. they uploaded victi videos, whee victims are shown receiving treatment. it sh
on the major indices, puts on the dows or puts on the spiders. i don't know anything about gold. if i'm forced into a hard asset, would i rather look at silver, but in bonds, i think the risk in bonds is extraordinary, but i'm not a bond guy, so it's a little prejudice, but that's a dangerous play to me. >> see you later. all right. here we go. we're going into the last hour here as we wrap up the trading week near the lows of the day and of the week, down 142 points. stick around. we may hear something out of this white house meeting during this second hour of the "closing bell" which gets under way right now. >>> and welcome back, everybody, to the "closing bell." i'm mandy drew i sitting in for maria bartiromo. lots of drama in washington. congressional leaders have arrived at white house. they arrived there about an hour ago with three days to go before we go over that proverbial fiscal cliff. they are meeting with the president and the treasury secretary timothy geithner, and they are trying to hash out a deal. but reports that the president has nothing new on the table has ended up spook
>> did the pentagon have review? >> no, didn't have fop once i'm retired from active due any i don't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where are those 3,0
suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or will they want to launch a chemical attack against israel, for instance, desperately trying to turn a domestic conflict into an arab israeli war that will take the pressure off them for a little bit, coe aless the people around israel and soing for. that's the dooms day scenario. >> wonderful, thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> this event took place at the 17th annual book festival in austin, texas. for more information, visit i was working for general nick nicholson doing really cool things, supporting my country. maybe i should write a book. really? compared to ben wagner? really? compared to jacob salvi as an
john boehner a dictator . this is what he had to say. >> the american people i don't think the house representative is operating without the house of representative. it is being operated with a dictatorship of the speaker not allowing the vast majority of the house and representatives to get what they want. >> that sounds ridiculous f. it was a dictatorship boehner would have gotten that vote and he couldn' get the vote. what we should do honestly guys, is swan dive ov the fiscal cliff. let president obama own the fiscal cliff. it should be called the obama cliff. >> julia: people know how much they would have to pay. folks on the man on the street interviews . people are looking at the numbers going what. >> kelly: in today's meeting should be a crucial meet the white house should have come with its plan and boehner should have come with a plan and senator reid should come with a plan but senator reid is name call speaker of the house john boehner giving retaliation of what is done . you have a lot of name calling. listen to what boehner said in response to senator reid. senator rei
bet, if you had to make a bet, paid 39.6 -- >> none of them. they just don't. and six people who were in that $200 million category paid nothing at all. they were around these 47%. they were the moochers. and they paid zero. you know, the way they get at them is a minimum tax. and it's very simple to do. and it will only apply on incomes a million above and another level at 10 million. >> what's the minimum tax again? >> the minimum tax, i would guess, would be 30% on income above a million, 35% above $10 million. and all kinds of people who are making that money, by labor, they're already paying those rates. >> would that also include people -- >> it would hit me. >> it would hit you. >> it would hit me. >> so you would not be paying 13, 14, 15% because of capital gains? >> no. >> i don't understand this, i'm making pretty good, but not warren buffett money. and of course, i'm paying my full 35%. he said, you have to figure out to convert this to capital gains, because if you do that, you only have to pay 15%. i said, what? i don't have the accountants to figure that out. >> governor
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